Shiv’s VR Exhibition @ Piksel Fest

I’m pleased to share that some assemblages from Shiv Integer have been included in the Copy / Paste exhibition at the Piksel Festival in Norway.

Copy Paste Poster
Poster of the exhibition

The exhibition, curated by Antonio Roberts (@hellocatfood), is visible online in the Piksel Cyber Salon from 22nd May – 21st June 2020.

The exhibition space, put together by Antonio and the Piksel team, takes place in a virtual room called Hubs by Mozilla. It allows visitors to navigate a virtual 3D space using only their browser or, for a better experience, using a virtual reality (VR) headset like an Oculus Quest or HTC Vive, for example.

Shiv Integer is a generative art project by Matthew Plummer-Fernandez and Julien Deswaef which takes the form of an art bot, rummaging through 3D printing parts freely available under Creative Commons, to create randomly assembled sculptures, then re-published on the same sharing platform, Thingiverse.

Here are some VR photos and videos of the sculptures in context (Screengrabs taken with an Oculus Quest. With another device, things may appear differently).

The list of artists included in the exhibition:

Carol Breen - http://imagemover.co.uk/
Peter Sunde - https://konsthack.se/
Eric Schrijver - https://ericschrijver.nl/
Constant - http://constantvzw.org/site/
Lorna Mills - http://www.digitalmediatree.com/sallymckay/LornaMillsImageDump/
Duncan Poulton - http://duncanpoulton.com/
Matthew Plummer-Fernandez - https://www.plummerfernandez.com/ + Julien Deswaef https://xuv.be/
LoVid - http://www.lovid.org/

History of the Alphabet

Evolution of Alphabet

Where does our Latin alphabet comes from? Why are letters in that order? Why do they have these shapes?

The symbol for the ox gave the A.
The symbol for the house, gave the B.

Fascinating story told by Matt Baker.

Interférences (String Network) | Alexis Langevin-Tétrault

Had the chance to see last night the performance of Alexis Langevin-Tétrault at “Visions of the Future III” and was blown away by the playfulness and dynamic aspect of it. It’s a perfect combination of powerful sound, subtle lighting and choreography working very well together. If you get the chance. Don’t miss it.

On stage, an audioreactive play of light unfolds gradually: Alexis Langevin-Tétrault (CA) builds a network of strings with which he interacts to create a sound universe between the industrial noise, electronica and acousmatic music.

Source: Interférences (String Network) | Alexis Langevin-Tétrault

(video link )
(Photo credit: Nicolas Bernier, 25/04/17, Salle Claude Champagne)

Highlights of the Blender Conference 2016

Here are three video recordings of presentations done at the latest Blender Conference that I think are worth watching.

Mad Entertairment Studio

I’ve never had the chance to attend the Blender Conference, but they have always provided live streaming and published recordings afterwards. The diversity and quality of the presentations invite me every time to go through it. There is a lot to discover in the field of 3D creation and, as with any open source software, people have used the tool in many different ways for the purpose of their research. So, after watching a few videos, here is my selection for this year.

Paul Melis uses Blender to demonstrate how path tracing works. Path tracing is a rendering method based the physical properties of light and thus simulates realistic lighting of a scene. Blender Foundation has developed a rendering engine called Cycles using this method. But how does it work? Paul Melis has modified Blender to literally show us how the rays are moving around in 3D before being turned into colored pixels. Along the way, he shows us how and why certain things might influence the final render.

For her PHD in media studies, Julia Velkova is focusing on open-source animation film production. She does not uses Blender, so this is not a technical presentation. Instead, she is focusing on the community, economy and mechanics behind the production of free culture using free / libre software. Her presentation puts in perspective contemporary media production with the history of art and technology. She also raises good questions for the Blender community and the free / libre art and technology practitioners as a whole. I’ll be looking forward to the conclusion of her PHD in a couple months.

MAD Entertainment Animation, is an Italian based animation studio that has gradually switched to a full Blender production pipeline over the last couple years. While this is more and more common in small sizes studios across the world, Ivan Cappiello presents here the latest projects they have been working on and shares the methodology they use when you don’t have big production budgets but still want to make big feature animation films.

I’ve singled out their presentation because of the particularly poetic look and feel they have achieved in their work (the illustration a the top of this article is a still from one of their production). But also for the Kinect based motion capture they use to help animators quickly set up poses for secondary character animation. All very inspiring.

There is of course a lot more presentations to watch if the subject and software is of any interest to you. So let me know which are your favorites from this year and why.

Git versioning and diff visualizing tools for designers

Git for Designers (1st slide)

Here is the video of my presentation at the Libre Graphics Meeting 2016, in London. For the most part, I expose my quest for a Git based visualizing tool that could help designers integrate a version control workflow.

The slides are viewable from here. You can also download them from this Gitlab repo.

If you find this video interesting or lacking more in-depth information about the subject, please have a look at these detailed blog posts:

  1. Collaborative tools for designers – Part 1
  2. Collaborative tools for designers – Part 2 : Dropbox
  3. Collaborative tools for designers – Part 3: Pixelapse
  4. Collaborative tools for designers – Part 4
  5. Collaborative tools for designers – Part 5: Adobe Creative Cloud
  6. Collaborative tools for designers – Part 6: the Githosters
  7. Github, why u show no more media files